What is the Higgs Bosen?: An Animated Video Explains

"The Higgs boson is a cornerstone of modern physics despite never being seen. It is believed to play a key role in imbuing things with mass. It is the last missing part of the Standard Model, a suite of equations that has held sway as the law of the cosmos for the last 35 years."

In popular culture the Higgs boson is also called the God particle after the title of a book by physicist Leon M Lederman, who claimed that the particle was God-like in that it was "so central to the state of physics today, so crucial to our final understanding of the structure of matter, yet so elusive".

 

This video quickly and simply explains what a particle accelorator/collider is, what a Higgs bosen is, and gives us a glimpse at why this is all important in order to understand the nature of the universe. 

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Comments (12)

  1. Munkyman

    that “the more energy you feed it, the more ‘interesting’ particles pop out” part is just the coolest thing because we know when you stack energy it tends to shift up in frequency… so hypothetically if we pile up enough energy in a super collision we could be “looking” into higher/lower frequency dimensions at the sub atomic level & begin seeing things that simply don’t exist unless we invade their frequency range. It engenders hope for a way to leap ahead of light by passing through another dimension.

    July 05, 2012
    1. Mel_Austin

      “…leap ahead of light by passing through another dimension” – I had not even thought about that- it’s quite an exciting concept. I was actually discussing the speed of light and space-time travel (we were watching an original Star Trek episode where the crew goes back in time) yesterday, but any discussion about dimensional travel was sort of hedged by the usual digression into treky/dork nonsense. To think, the Higgs bosen particle may have been discovered while I was having that conversation. Absolutely nuts!

      July 05, 2012
      1. Munkyman

        time travel is such a difficult concept to reconcile, because we exist the likelihood of that with time travel in the hands of anything remotely human is pretty unlikely. Someone would have gone back & “fixed” some war & no freedom would be left. Now we have the ability to “virtually” time travel forward in space by traveling near light speed & in deep enough in a gravity well but, returning isn’t an option. In that theory you could spend a year of your relative time orbiting the Sun in a super impervious vehicle at very close range & at 0.99999999999999999999999999999999999999 the speed of light you might come home 100 years or so in the future, maybe 300, maybe 20… you get the idea.

        July 05, 2012
        1. Mel_Austin

          I was also noting yesterday that time travel only works forward, not backwards as it did in the Star Trek episode we were watching (it’s called The Naked Time). Still, time travel in any direction is fascinating and pertinent to discussions about space travel in general. Have you ever read the book Tao Zero by Poul Anderson? It’s an old one, but worth checking out, and touches upon some interesting concepts regarding traveling forward through space and time.

          July 05, 2012
          1. Munkyman

            I’m sure I have he wrote with Larry Niven & I’ve read most of the stuff from that crowd.

            July 05, 2012
      2. Munkyman

        Because time is relative, there are some fun games you can play with it’s elasticity.

        July 05, 2012
  2. Munkyman

    You should “youtube” richard feynman. If you like what you see you should read some of his books, he’s one of the most interesting physicists in the whole of history… in my opinion.

    July 05, 2012
    1. Mel_Austin

      I actually started Six Easy Pieces, but never got around to finishing it. He’s definitely an interesting fellow though, both in intellect and character. Right now I’m ‘reading’ (audio book) 13 Things That Don’t Make Sense by Michael Brooks, which details some of the history and mystery surrounding 13 anomalies that are as yet unexplainable about the universe. Feynman is quoted and referenced in several chapters for obvious reasons

      July 05, 2012
      1. Munkyman

        nice I’ll have to check it out. You might enjoy Feynman’s book Q.E.D. (Six Not So Easy Pieces is available as a series of lectures you can listen to, I found reading them & listening to the lectures made it far more engaging. He’s also got a couple anecdotal books that are great fun to read. That’s how I stumbled on to him, as a teen I found one of his books in the grocery & it was so good I decided to read them all & then I began trying to understand his work.

        July 05, 2012
        1. Mel_Austin

          I generally understand more if I can both see and hear the information being given to me, so I’ll have to look into getting my hands on those lectures. I only stumbled onto Feynman after reading the Physics Beyond Star Trek by Lawrence M. Krauss. I’m fairly convinced that it’s impossible to write a half-way decent and reliable book about physics without mentioning him somewhere (usually multiple times)- which says a lot about the contributions he’s made to the field.

          July 05, 2012
          1. Munkyman

            Feynman wrote the 1st reliable chapter on Quantum Physics, he inspired the field of nano technology & he helped usher in the atomic age.

            July 05, 2012
  3. ellieherman

    What is the animated video for the skilled and for all performed. The writing companies for the perfection for the animated for the reflected and in conceived for the pertinent nature.

    November 25, 2016